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USEA News

September 23, 2018

The rainfall at Loch Moy Farm in Adamstown, Md. couldn’t dampen the spirits of the 14 2-year-olds, 12 yearlings, and their handlers who came to compete at the second and final day of the USEA Future Event Horse (FEH) East Coast Championships. Judges Robin Walker and Peter Gray judged a total of 50 young horses aging from yearlings to 4-year-olds over the course of the two-day competition.


Jaguar My and handler Alyssa Peterson. USEA/Jessica Duffy Photo.

September 21, 2018

The fillies were on fire at the 2018 USEA Future Event Horse (FEH) West Coast Championships at Twin Rivers Ranch in Paso Robles, California. Twain’s Fireflight DF, the Overall Yearling Champion, Iluminada, the Overall 2-Year-Old Champion, and Hallelujah DF, the FEH 3-year-old Grand Champion are all fillies that packed a powerful punch to come out on top. To add the cherry on top, Cheron Laboissonniere’s Holsteiner mare Hallelujah DF (Mighty Magic x Columbia BF) pulled off a hat trick as she earned her third consecutive FEH championship title.

September 20, 2018

The USEA Future Event Horse (FEH) East Coast, West Coast, and Central Championships are being held over the next two weeks. First, the West Coast Championships will be held at Twin Rivers Ranch in Paso Robles, California today, Thursday, September 20. Loch Moy Farm in Adamstown, Maryland, will host the East Coast Championships this coming weekend, Septebmer 22 and 23. Finally, the Central Championships will be held for the first time at the Texas Rose Horse Park in Tyler, Texas. The USEA will be on the ground providing coverage at all three events.

September 7, 2018

The USEA Young Event Horse Program (YEH) introduced the Holekamp/Turner Young Event Horse Le Lion d’Angers Prize and Grant in 2012 with the support of Dr. Timothy and Cheryl Holekamp and Christine Turner to encourage the development of future U.S. Eventing Team horses by providing them with increased international exposure and opportunity as young horses.

August 28, 2018

“I like a horse to look athletic and balanced even standing still and I have to say Mr. Medicott checked nearly all the boxes,” described Helen Brettell of her favorite four-star horse. Brettell can be seen at events across the country as the President of the Ground Jury, a dressage judge at the national and international level, or a Young Event Horse (YEH) and Future Event Horse (FEH) judge. Born and raised in England, Brettell has years of experience competing at the upper levels both in Europe and the United States. An advocate for proper, correct foundation in young horses, Brettell looks for an “overall balanced athlete with clean straight limbs, good feet, an alert eye, and a big shoulder for reach and uphill balance.”

July 23, 2018

Cooley is a common name among the international eventing community, and one that the United States Eventing Association (USEA) Young Event Horse (YEH) program has certainly noticed. Cooley Off the Record, now known as Off the Record, made his mark in the reign of Cooley horses with his most recent win at the Brook Ledge Great Meadow International presented by Adequan FEI Eventing Nations Cup CICO3* with William Coleman in the irons. A win proving that he is not a horse for the future but a horse to watch now. Horses like Off the Record can transform into competitive upper level event horses by starting their eventing careers in the USEA’s Young, Future, or New Event Horse Programs.

July 12, 2018

Amidst the humid air, glaring sun, and ninety-degree summer heat, nine horses proved their weight in gold at Loch Moy Farm’s Future Event Horse (FEH) jump chute clinic on Thursday, July 5 in Adamstown, Md. Following the day after Independence Day, it was no coincidence that the majority of young horses were American bred. The United States Eventing Association (USEA) FEH program aims to shed light on American breeding programs that produce upper level event horses.

June 30, 2018

Power, speed, agility, and heart; traces of Thoroughbred blood can be found in almost every top event horse. So, what happens when a horse with 100 percent blood, known as the full Thoroughbred, is taken up the levels of eventing? With a program built around exactly that, Meghan O’Donoghue knows a thing or two about how to produce a young Thoroughbred into a top event horse.

After a life on the track, it can become difficult to determine which off-the-track Thoroughbreds (OTTB) will excel in eventing. Therefore, the United States Eventing Association (USEA) tapped into O’Donoghue’s expertise on the Thoroughbred breed, specifically ones that come from the racetrack, and how these horses can succeed in the USEA Young Event Horse (YEH) Program.

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